shanyceboom:

theanimationarchive:

Art Story Kickstarter by Aaron Blaise & Chuck Williams

Sometimes a Kickstarter comes along and you want to go straight to the bank and withdraw everything you have and just throw all your money at the computer screen - this is one of those times.

Veteran Disney animators Aaron Blaise & Chuck Williams have joined forces to create something pretty magical - ART STORY!

It’s a story about an 11-year-old, meticulous boy, WALT, and his crazy, loopy GRANDPA — two complete opposites — who get stuck in a vast, imaginative WORLD OF PAINTINGS. Inside, they cross paths with a ruthless painted character determined to make it into our world. In order to get home and stop the villain, Walt and Grandpa have to set aside their differences, work together and navigate worlds where the rules can change around every corner.

It’s structured like a hilarious, character-driven, buddy picture (“Planes, Trains & Automobiles,” “I Love You, Man” etc.), but takes place INSIDE THE WORLD OF SOME OF THE GREAT MASTER PAINTINGS OF ALL TIME … where the characters change their appearance to match the style of each painting — and meet lots of wildly entertaining characters. It also explores and was inspired by that special relationship between a grandchild and their grandparent — not something you see often in films nowadays.

Joan Gratz gave us a great look into how the world of animation and fine art can blend in her Academy Award winning short, Mona Lisa Descending A Staircase. And I think Art Story is something that would take that to the next level.

Art Story looks and sounds like it could be a really great and thought provoking film. I highly recommend checking out and possibly donating to the films KICKSTARTER.

For more information check out a short interview that Aaron Blaise & Chuck Williams did over at Aint it Cool News.

ART STORY official KICKSTARTER

This is an awesome thing.

To reduce my spending, I’m looking into getting a roommate. In DC. Meaning that I will, once again, be living with another person. That’s not a bad thing persay. But I really got comfortable with living alone. I won’t even begin to divulge the weird, random and downright mouth gaping  things I’ve done while living alone, but…….. let’s just say I related to parts of this video. 

 

The Way (ft. Mac Miller) - Ariana Grande

image

image

(via commedesbrazil)

androphilia:

Pepe by Paolo Woods and Ben Depp

Port au Prince’s Fifth Avenue is a waterfront road, just off the harbor, where mountains of second hand clothes bake in the tropical sun. The market, Croix-des-Bossales, is where the slaves used to be sold. Now it is not strong men from Africa that the merchants receive, but containers loaded with skirts, pants and shirts from the US. These second-hand garments are called “Pepe” and it is increasingly difficult to see a Haitian wearing something that has not been previously worn by an American.
A t-shirt produced for Wal-Mart in the sweatshops of Port au Prince will be sported by a Texan and then returned to the sender, who, at last, will be able to wear it. This back and forth gives us a peek into the workings of the globalization of the textile industry.
The majority of “Pepe” that arrive on the island have been donated by Americans to charities and collection centers, rejected by Thrift shops, and have gone through the sorting warehouses run by Haitians in Miami that discard the winter clothes and other unmarketable items from the lot. But the worst T-shirts, those that would barely be sold in the cheap gift shops of Times Square, those with the dumbest slogans, reappear, thanks to a free-market miracle, in remote provinces of Haiti where nobody has taken the effort of translating such poetry into Creole.
It is said that the T-shirt, along with the bumper sticker, is America’s favorite place for self-expression, a kind of personal billboard, where political, philosophical and religious beliefs are condensed. Paolo Woods and Ben Depp, two photographers living in Haiti, went on the hunt for the perfect T-shirt.
All of this would be amusing and ironic if the “Pepe” trade had not put out of business thousands of Haitian tailors. But little can stem this garment flow if not the economic crisis that has made Americans a little more cautious about “popping tags”.
“Pepe”, or how lousy T-shirts exemplify fifty years of a North-South relationship.
Arnaud Robert

(via afro-art-chick)

 

A few things you can do if you’re not too pleased or just downright angry with Zimmermans’ not guilty verdict: 



1) Sign this petition urging the DOJ to bring civil rights charges against Zimmerman. The website is down, but keep circulating this! http://www.naacp.org/page/s/doj-civil-rights-petition?utm_medium=email&utm_source=NAACP 

2) Reach out to your local state representative and work to change the legality and blurred lines within the Stand Your Ground laws. 

3) Sign this white house petition https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/civil-rights-prosecution-george-zimmerman-united-states-department-justice-death-trayvon-martin/LkGHz0VH

The Sound of Colors: Neil Harbisson is an “eyeborg” who hears a symphony of color. This visualization shows which colors sound which notes for him.
Read more: http://wp.me/p10512-kJqWatch the talk: http://www.ted.com/talks/neil_harbisson_i_listen_to_color.html

The Sound of Colors: Neil Harbisson is an “eyeborg” who hears a symphony of color. This visualization shows which colors sound which notes for him.


Read more: http://wp.me/p10512-kJq

Watch the talk: http://www.ted.com/talks/neil_harbisson_i_listen_to_color.html

i hate you.

jndu:

1.
Nothing ends
every blade of grass
remembering your sound

2.
your sounds exploding
in the universe return
to earth in prayer

3.
as you drummed
your hands kept
reaching for God

4.
the morning sky
so lovely imitates
your laughter

5.
you came warrior
clear your music
kissing our…

(via icgreeneyes)

Life Hacks: Clothing edition

(Source: viekastv, via myownfashiionbook)

bleedgold:

The most popular girls at school photographed by Lauren Greenfield
“This picture was taken in 1998, at a time when people were just beginning to realise what “mean girls” were, and how brutal and cliquey and excluding they could be. I was on an assignment for the New York Times magazine, for a special issue about being 13. They sent me to a place in Minnesota called Edina, right in the heartland of the US. It was so interesting: in a book I did called Fast Forward, I had been taking a look at how kids grow up really quickly in Los Angeles. But in Minnesota, where life is supposedly not as fast-paced as in LA, I found kids who were equally precocious.
This group of girls were in the popular clique at their school. Popularity was very codified: all the kids knew you had to shop in three particular stores, and that you needed to be blond, thin and blue-eyed. The girls were on their way to their first big party of the seventh grade. I spent a lot of time inside one of their houses, photographing them doing their makeup and combing their hair. Then we came outside. In the beautiful late-afternoon light, they lined up and started posing – it was very much their idea rather than mine.
What I love is that each girl has a different personality in the image, and you can read into it what their status is in the clique. Hannah, the third girl in the purple, was actually deemed the most popular girl at school. But she told me later that she wasn’t actually sure about her group of friends: they could be mean, and people would get criticised if they didn’t look a certain way. Even if you’re in the place everyone wants to be in, as she was, there’s still a lot of pressure to keep up the grade. In a way, she felt it was bad to be popular.” 

bleedgold:

The most popular girls at school photographed by Lauren Greenfield

“This picture was taken in 1998, at a time when people were just beginning to realise what “mean girls” were, and how brutal and cliquey and excluding they could be. I was on an assignment for the New York Times magazine, for a special issue about being 13. They sent me to a place in Minnesota called Edina, right in the heartland of the US. It was so interesting: in a book I did called Fast Forward, I had been taking a look at how kids grow up really quickly in Los Angeles. But in Minnesota, where life is supposedly not as fast-paced as in LA, I found kids who were equally precocious.

This group of girls were in the popular clique at their school. Popularity was very codified: all the kids knew you had to shop in three particular stores, and that you needed to be blond, thin and blue-eyed. The girls were on their way to their first big party of the seventh grade. I spent a lot of time inside one of their houses, photographing them doing their makeup and combing their hair. Then we came outside. In the beautiful late-afternoon light, they lined up and started posing – it was very much their idea rather than mine.

What I love is that each girl has a different personality in the image, and you can read into it what their status is in the clique. Hannah, the third girl in the purple, was actually deemed the most popular girl at school. But she told me later that she wasn’t actually sure about her group of friends: they could be mean, and people would get criticised if they didn’t look a certain way. Even if you’re in the place everyone wants to be in, as she was, there’s still a lot of pressure to keep up the grade. In a way, she felt it was bad to be popular.” 

(via lovemetoinfinity)

Can you be friends with benefits: a flowchart

Can you be friends with benefits: a flowchart

Wilson Pickett backed by Jimi Hendrix, NYC (May 1966)

Wilson Pickett backed by Jimi Hendrix, NYC (May 1966)

(Source: afro-art-chick)

The now infamous Beyonce stank face meme, in GIFs

(via missjia)